KNOXVILLE LATIN MASS COMMUNITY NEWSLETTER

 

MASS THIS SUNDAY (October 21, 2018)

22nd Sunday after Pentecost

12:00 noon, Holy Ghost Church, Knoxville

St. Edmund Campion Missal & Hymnal page numbers:

Sprinkling Rite:   Asperges me  (567)

Order of Mass:  Missalette or Campion Missal (569)

Proper Prayers and Readings  (402) – online here, leaflet here

Ordinary:  Kyrie, Gloria, Credo III, Sanctus, Agnus DeiMass XI Orbis Factor (727)

Preface of the Holy Trinity (Missalettes; Campion 598, Angelus 875, Baronius 884)
Final Marian Antiphon:  Salve Regina – from Trinity Sunday until Advent

     (online here, Campion Missal 961, Angelus Missal 116, Baronius Missal 121)

8 am, St. Mary Church, Athens

3 pm, St. Therese of Lisieux Church, Cleveland

                                    

MASS NEXT SUNDAY (October 28, 2018)
Feast of Christ the King

12 noon, Holy Ghost Church, Knoxville

8 am, St. Mary Church, Athens

5 pm, Basilica of Sts. Peter & Paul, Chattanooga

 

LATIN MASS OF ALL SAINTS
Thursday, November 1, 2018 (holy day of obligation)

5:00 pm – Holy Ghost Church, Knoxville

 

LATIN MASS OF ALL SOULS
Friday, November 2, 2018

6:00 pm – Holy Ghost Church, Knoxville

 

 

RESTORE OR REBUILD THE CHURCH AND THE MASS?

Extracts from a recent Crisis Magazine article (here):

 

Our youngest daughter and I recently found ourselves at a Latin High Mass at the beautiful Oratory of St. Francis de Sales in St. Louis (at right). It had been a few years since I had been there; while my attraction to Mass in the old “extraordinary” form has been strong . . . This was our 15-year-old’s idea, and I embraced it. As always, attending these Masses helps me reflect about the way things used to be, the way they are now, and the way they should be. To some extent, they provide the antidote to some of what ails the Church today.

 

The Mass was long, but not in a bad way. . . .  the Mass took roughly an hour and forty-five minutes. . . . Adding to the length of the Mass was the chanting throughout, it being a High “Sung” Mass. While many Masses as experienced in parishes today have the “four-hymn sandwich” (opening, offertory, communion, recessional), the chant experienced throughout the High Mass ties it all together, as Martin Mosebach points out in The Heresy of Formlessness:The bond that Gregorian Chant weaves throughout liturgical action and song is so close that it is impossible to separate form and content.” When it came time for communion, the choir sang Palestrina’s powerful polyphonic motet Sicut Cervus.

 

Perhaps the best reflection of our experience that Sunday was considering those filling the pews at St. Francis de Sales. It was not a tiny group of elderly people who remember how beautiful Mass was back in the 1950s, but rather a very mixed demographic that included several young families, and there were 200 or more in attendance. The fact of the matter is, the Old Mass has become new again, rediscovered by a new generation who will appreciate it, something else Mosebach points out in The Heresy of Formlessness. It is not simple nostalgia that brings young Catholics to the Mass, but a need for a deeper experience than they had been receiving from those who run the churches, the generation that embraced a twisted understanding of the so-called “Spirit” of Vatican II.

 

 

Thinking this traditional Latin Mass, I could not help but call to mind one of the parish revitalization programs popular today . . . At its core, the “Rebuilt program” (one encouraged actively in my home archdiocese) aims to create a welcome “weekend experience” for the community . . . While everything in the Mass my daughter and I experienced that late-summer Sunday was pointed to the Eucharistic Sacrifice, the Rebuilt model appears to focus on everything else.

 

The capital campaign to help restore St. Francis de Sales Oratory is called “Tradition for Tomorrow.” Judging from the number of those in the pew and their average age, and the simple desire of our teen daughter to explore something other than our usual parish for a Sunday Mass, the real success in growing the Church and saving souls will take place when churches [and the Mass] are restored, not Rebuilt.

 

STILL MORE BEAUTIFUL PHOTOS - OF THE FIRST TRADITIONAL

BENEDICTINE ABBATIAL CONSECRATION IN U.S. HISTORY
From the current newsletter (here) of the traditional Benedictines of Mary, Queen of Apostles.

 

 

 

 

 

Bishop James Vann Johnston – native son of Holy Ghost in Knoxville

 

 

 

ENROLLMENT IN THE BROWN SCAPULAR
Fr. Hendershott plans to offer enrollment in the Brown Scapular confraternity at 11:15 am on Sunday, November 4. Click here for information about history and practice of the brown scapular devotion. Brown scapulars to be blessed at the enrollment are available in Catholic bookstores and online (google “purchase brown scapular”).

 

 

ONLINE WEEKLY LATIN MASS NEWSLETTER
To receive a weekly notice of the Latin Mass newsletter when it is posted (here) at the KLMC web site . . . Just send your name and e-mail to   h.edwards@mindspring.com  The posted e-mail version has live internet links, and usually includes photos and other features that don’t fit in the printed version.  Typically, the online newsletter is several times longer than the brief Sunday handout.

 

www.KnoxLatinMass.net